Events to Learn about Indigenous Peoples

We’re planning multiple events and family friendly activities to celebrate the many indigenous communities across Massachusetts and the country; and commemorate their shared history and culture. Wellesley will celebrate Indigenous Peoples Day on October 12th and 14th. Please save the dates!

Upcoming

There are no upcoming events.

Past Events

National Day of Mourning 2020

Date: November 26, 2020

Time: 12:00 pm

Location: Online

National Day of Mourning 2020

The livestream and pre-recorded content for the National Day of Mourning on November 26 can be viewed beginning at approximately 12 noon EST via the United American Indians of New England (UAINE) website, at the UAINE facebook group, on Youtube, and at the hate5six website.

Myth Busting Thanksgiving

Date: October 28, 2020

Time: 3:00 - 4:00 pm

Location: Online

mythbusting thanksgiving

If you plan to have your students learn and write about Thanksgiving, this webinar will help you teach this topic with greater accuracy and sensitivity. Kisha James, enrolled member of the Wampanoag Tribe of Gayhead Aquinnah and Oglala Lakota and the grand-daughter of Wamsutta James, will cover common myths. Dr. Debbie Reese, tribally enrolled, Nambé Pueblo, will share recommendations for books and curricular materials. Hear advice on materials selection and suggestions for teaching Thanksgiving with cultural sensitivity. See examples of possible Thanksgiving writing tasks, and hear them critiqued.

This event is offered by our partners.

Indigenous Peoples Day Virtual Film and Community Dialogue

Date: October 12, 2020

Time: 3:00 - 4:15 pm

Location: Zoom

IPD film Lyla June

Please join us for a short film presenting Lyla June, an Indigenous environmental scientist, educator, community organizer and musician. Lyla June, who is of Diné (Navajo), Tsétsêhéstâhese (Cheyenne) and European lineage is from Taos New Mexico.  She inspires personal, collective and ecological healing through her multi-genre presentations on the topics of climate crisis, Indigenous rights, inter-cultural healing, and traditional land stewardship practices. After the short film there will be a community discussion.

Indigenous Peoples Day Land Clean Up

Start date: October 10, 2020

End date: October 12, 2020

IPD land clean up

Let’s honor Mother Earth by working together to clean up our town!

Join us this weekend for the 2nd Stewards of the Earth event where you will SAFELY gather with family, friends and neighbors and clean your neighborhood, local trails and ponds. The brook near Whole Foods is in need of our special attention. If you know of other high need spots, please post them to this event’s discussion board after signing up.
Please post photos of your clean up efforts on social media with the hashtags #indigenouspeoplesday #IPDcleanup #IPDwellesley and tag @worldofwellesley @ipdwellesley.
If you would like us to share your photos on the World of Wellesley or Committee for Indigenous Peoples Day Wellesley websites, please send them to communications@worldofwellesley.org.

30 Day+ Racial Equity Indigenous Peoples Challenge

Start date: October 1, 2020

End date: October 30, 2020

IP Challenge

World of Wellesley is proud to launch the 30 Day+ Racial Equity Indigenous Peoples Challenge aimed at breaking down barriers and biases by collectively and individually:

  • Increasing our awareness and appreciation for the diversity of Indigenous people
  • Deepening our understanding about the history of Indigenous people
  • Deepen our understanding about the current issues faced by Indigenous people in North America

How it works:

  1. Sign up to receive a daily email through October 30th with three ways to access content each day (e.g. reading, watching or listening).
  2. Choose one or all of the suggested daily options. It’s all up to you. You may also add other options, if you choose.
  3. Reflect: Create your own copy of this journal template to privately record your thoughts.  Your journal will not be shared.
  4. Collaborate: If you want to share reflections in community, you may post them on our Racial Equity Indigenous Peoples Challenge padlet. Please follow our guidelines for all public reflection posts.

“Praying Town” Film and Discussion

Date: August 20, 2020

Time: 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Location: Zoom

praying town
“Praying Town” is a documentary that explores the history of Natick’s Praying Indians tribe from the 1630’s to the Civil War. We will watch part one of the film will be followed by facilitated dialogue and discussion. Everyone is welcome and invited to continue to learn our history and deepen our understanding about the origins of white supremacy in this country.

Watch Documentary Trailer

From Smallpox to COVID-19: Microbes, Hate, and History

Date: July 29, 2020

Time: 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Location: Zoom

From Smallpox to COVID-19

From smallpox and measles, to cholera, dysentery, and tuberculosis, Indigenous peoples have suffered disproportionate loss of life from disease since European settlers began to trade with them and later occupy their land. The novel coronavirus has impacted Indigenous peoples with a familiar ferocity, flagging their perennial lack of good jobs, housing, and healthcare. Join a distinguished panel of experts to learn about the historical and present-day conditions that have made Indigenous people especially vulnerable to disease, and the strategies required to break this pattern of discrimination and social violence.

Panelists will include Ramona Peters (Mashpee Wampanoag), Chairwoman of the Native Land Conservancy, Lorén Spears (Narragansett/Niantic), Executive Director of the Tomaquag Museum, and Mishy Lesser, Learning Director at the Upstander Project. The discussion will be moderated by Claudia Fox Tree (Arawak) of the Massachusetts Center for Native American Awareness.

This is a partner event co-presented by Revolutionary Spaces and the Upstander Project.

“Doctrine of Discovery” Film Viewing & Discussion

Date: July 23, 2020

Time: 7:00 pm

Location: Zoom

Doctrine of Discovery film

How did European explorers and colonial settlers use the Doctrine of Discovery to justify the taking of Native peoples’ land in what became the United States?

“We study the Doctrine of Discovery to listen to voices that have been silenced and disregarded for centuries. These voices tell a frequently overlooked story about the origins of the United States.”—Upstander Project.

For more information on the Doctrine of Discovery, visit upstanderproject.org.

Indigenous Peoples Day Children and Family Event

Date: October 14, 2019

Time: 11:00 AM - 1:15 PM

Location: Schofield Elementary School

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Please join the World of Wellesley in honoring Indigenous Peoples Day with a children and family event that will explore Indigenous culture, traditions, and history. Professional educator Claudia Fox Tree, M.Ed. (Arawak/Yurumein)​, will lead our engagement together with a presentation centered on Native American (First Nations People) identity, culture, and history. Indigenous food options and pizza will be served. Opening ceremony begins at 11:00 AM. FREE and open to the public.​

See video clips and photos from this event.

First Light Flashback: A Performance by Annawon Weeden

Date: October 13, 2019

Time: 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Location: 26 Benvenue St, Wellesley

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The World of Wellesley invites the community to join for this special presentation.

Annawon Weeden explains that “Wampanoag means ‘People of the First Light’ due to our geographic location as the furthest eastern tribe.” Born and raised in the tribal community of Charlestown, R.I., among relatives of both Narragansett/Pequot lineage through his father, Annawon now resides in his mother’s Wampanoag community in Mashpee. Following in his father’s footsteps, Annawon began sharing the culture of his tribes with his family during public programs and performances at a young age. As an adult, Annawon’s passion for preserving the culture has been clear throughout decades spent working at Plymouth Plantation as a museum interpreter and outreach educator, as well as the Boston Children’s Museum as a Native program specialist. He has also been invited to visit Wellesley Public Schools over 20 times.

This program is free and open to the public, made possible by Wellesley business sponsors in this year’s program book. Pre-registration is encouraged.